Tuco Launches New Hull Technology

Tuco has partnered with EffectShips International and Diab in an innovative technology project in designing a vessel in carbon fiber featuring unique and patented hull technology.

Offshore Support Vessels are being used for transporting both cargo and passengers to oil – and gas – fields or windmill parks. Up until this moment, the conventional vessels in this category are built in steel or aluminum.

The main focus within the innovation project, funded by The Danish Markedsmodningsfonden is the development of a new type of vessel that can set new standards for energy efficiency, by being significantly lighter thus using significantly less fuel.

“The focus within this innovative project is the development and build of a prototype of a new type of vessel that can set new technological standards for energy efficiency, by being significantly lighter thus using significantly less fuel. The project partners will each bring know-how on different fields which brought together will make it possible to create new technological constellations,” said Jonas Pedersen, Managing Director of Tuco Marine Group.


A 17m prototype vessel is going to be build using the ASV (Air Supported Vessel) Technology, where minimizing hull resistance is the key ingredient, utilizing – pressurized air – entrapped under the hull. The hull integrated air cushion chambers, will support and separate hull and water. An ASV is designed for a minimum of air cushion ventilation.

When activating the air support system, approximately 70% of the overall weight of the vessel will be supported on a cushion of pressurized air, entrapped in a very well enclosed air cavity underneath the vessel. In contradiction to a hovercraft or a SES, using rubber skirts to seal of the air cushion, the new ASV Technology utilizes solid, rigid hull elements to maintain the pressurized air underneath the boat. ASV designs can be “tailor made’’ and / or optimized for different functions, all depending on the end users’ requirements and vessel operations. For even further weight reduction, the Offshore Support Vessel is going to be built in a carbon fiber sandwich.

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Press release; Image: tuco

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