Ex-Coal Power Plant Site Starts Showing Offshore Wind Contours

Demolition works at the site of the former Brayton Point coal-fired power plant in Massachusetts, U.S., are nearing completion, with grading activities scheduled to start soon. The works are part of an overhaul of the site that will turn it into an offshore wind hub.

An aerial photo of Brayton Point site under construction
Source: CDC

“Our crews have safely deconstructed and removed 1.5 million square feet of former power plant infrastructure. We now have a blank canvas to create a platform for new development as the site matures into Brayton Point Commerce Center,” said Russ Becker, President of EnviroAnalytics Group, a North American environmental remediation company.

The works at the site started some 18 months ago, following the acquisition of the former coal power plant site by Commercial Development Company (CDC), a real estate acquisition and development company, in early 2018.

“Grading activities will commence this spring to prepare laydown and manufacturing areas for future tenants. The grading plan is designed in accordance with the offshore wind industry requirements for a marshalling port and manufacturing of offshore wind components,” Becker said.

CDC states that it has been engaged in extensive discussions with major offshore wind industry companies.

Preliminary route plan for monopile transport and laydown at Brayton Point. Image source: CDC

“We have seen significant interest from prospective tenants wishing to use the port for offshore wind operations. These discussions take time as the investments are sizable,” said Stephen Collins, Executive Vice President at CDC.

According to CDC, Brayton Point Commerce Center has already received a total of nine vessel calls so far, including offshore wind research vessels, yacht transporters, bulk carriers and tug and barge units.

“Of particular interest to the offshore wind sector are Brayton Point’s now proven abilities to conduct efficient heavy lift port operations and receive deep-draft ocean-going vessels at the site’s newly redeveloped marine commerce terminal,” CDC states.

In May 2019, Anbaric entered into an agreement with CDC to establish a 1,200 MW high voltage direct current converter and 400 MW battery storage at Brayton Point.

Rendering of Anbaric’s renewable energy plans. Image source: CDC

The following month, CDC and Patriot Stevedoring + Logistics signed a port operations agreement, under which Patriot, a joint venture of Carver Stevedoring Services and Pangaea Logistics Solutions, would manage operations of the marine commerce terminal and work to create a regional logistics port with global distribution capabilities.

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